Sunday, July 16, 2017

Fwd: Turkey arrests Amnesty International’s local director

india should probably arrest the local amnesty guy aakar patel for anti national activities.

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: The Economist News Desk <noreply@email.economist.com>
Date: Fri, Jul 14, 2017 at 10:54 PM
Subject: Turkey arrests Amnesty International's local director
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Daily Dispatch | Friday | July 14th 2017
 
 
 
 
Turkey and the West: Travesty international
In 1998 Recep Tayyip Erdogan, then Istanbul's mayor, was jailed for reading out a poem. Amnesty International wrote to the government and demanded his release. Last week the Turkish government, with Mr Erdogan as president, arrested the human-rights group's local director. Tomorrow he will spend the first anniversary of Turkey's failed coup in jail. The West's silence over the repression in Turkey is becoming ever harder to maintain
 
 
 
 
Trumpcare: Version three
Is the Senate's revised health-care proposal a good bill? And will it pass? (Ideally these two questions would be related. But they are not.) It would probably leave more Americans without usable health care and it does not do much to reduce the cost or increase the quality of care. It is not a good proposal. Yet there is a 50:50 chance that the bill, or something like it, will become law, writes our United States editor
 
 
 
 
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EU bureaucrats: Expect the unelected
Eurosceptics are fond of referring to European Union officials as "unelected bureaucrats". But every government has bureaucrats, who are by nature unelected. If anyone proposed a direct EU-wide election for the president of the European Commission, Eurosceptics would surely reject it. Critics do have a valid case against the EU: not that its bureaucrats are unelected, but that they are too insulated from democracy, writes our Europe editor
 
 
 
Brexit and airlines: Prepare for a hard landing
Today EasyJet, Europe's second-biggest budget airline, revealed it will set up a subsidiary in Austria. Other airlines with British ownership are checking their options. They fret that a hard Brexit might strip British carriers of their right to fly routes within the EU. The most pessimistic in the industry say there is a real prospect that flights between Britain and the continent could be halted altogether in 2019, writes our business-travel editor
 
 
 
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